Monday, May 29, 2017

The way were-----We'll Meet Again - Vera Lynn

Teacher Wears Pizza Uniform From Second Job To Protest Pay [Michigan Capitol Confidential]

Teacher Wears Pizza Uniform From Second Job To Protest Pay [Michigan Capitol Confidential]
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"Ann Arbor Public Schools teacher Jeff Kass came to the district’s board meeting May 24 dressed in the uniform he wears while working a second job at a pizza restaurant.
According to the website AnnArbivore, Kass said he wore the uniform to represent all the teachers who have to work second jobs to make their mortgage payments.
“He is going to tell the truth of what it feels like to be a 50 y/o man who has to sling pizza to make ends meet while still teaching,” AnnArbivore reported.
The website reports that Kass received a standing ovation.
What it did not report was that the Ann Arbor school system paid Kass $83,155 in 2015-16, up 5 percent from two years earlier, according a state teacher salary database..."

Shocker: Study Shows Physically Weak Men Tend to be Liberal

Shocker: Study Shows Physically Weak Men Tend to be Liberal:
In news that will surprise absolutely no one, a new study reveals that girly men are more likely to favor socialist policies. 
The study, conducted by researchers at Brunel University London, looked at the height, weight, physical strength, and bicep circumference of 171 men, along with their views on wealth redistribution and income inequality.
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The study, published in the Evolution and Human Behavior journal, found that weaker men were more likely to favor socialist policies than stronger men.
Images of Harry Reid and his “weightlifting” mishap come immediately to mind. 
One of the study’s researchers, Michael Price, said it’s all about the evolution of the mind.
“This is about our Stone Age brains, in a modern society,” said Dr. Price. “Our minds evolved in environments where strength was a big determinant of success. If you find yourself in a body not threatened by other males, if you feel you can win competitions for status, then maybe you start thinking inequality is pretty good.”

ISIS moves into Southeast Asia - Washington Times

ISIS moves into Southeast Asia - Washington Times:

"Western powers and media outlets convulsed in shock at last week’s horrific suicide attack on a pop concert in Britain, but little attention was paid to a surge of violence by the Islamic State on the other side of the world — specifically in the Philippines and Indonesia.
Image result for Flicker Commons Images Philippines and IndonesiaDozens have died since a Southeast Asian faction of the organization also known as ISIS and ISIL raised its black flag over a key southern Philippine city on Wednesday, the same day that a double suicide bombing since claimed by the terrorist group rocked the Indonesian capital of Jakarta.
With terrorism analysts having warned months ago that the Islamic State could surge in the region as it lost territory in the Middle East, U.S. intelligence officials have expressed particular wariness "


Memorial Day in New Hampshire :: SteynOnline

Memorial Day in New Hampshire :: SteynOnline:
"Most of my book The [Un]documented Mark Steyn is written by yours truly, but for six lines on page 243 I roped in the real talent in the family:
Time passes, and moss and lichen creep across ancient grave stones. 
But the men beneath them are forever young.
At Memorial Day observances in my neck of the woods, the veterans are honored by the fifth graders, who read verses for the occasion - both the classics and their own poems. 
The latter can be a bit hit and miss, and one has to be alert, given the dispositions of some of my neighbors, for give-peace-a-chance war-is-never-the-answer not-so-subtle subtexts. 
Image result for old new ww2 photosBut a couple of years ago my then fifth-grade daughter was asked to write something, and so she did. 
Nothing to do with me - I was away in Chicago all that week - but I was pleased to see that all the rhymes are true. 
She is older now and has gotten a little teenagey, as they do, and today she would try to write it more sophisticatedly. 
But I have always liked its heartfelt directness. 
So this is my daughter's fifth-grade poem, as a ten-year-old girl delivered it on a small town common for Memorial Day:

The stars and stripes, red, white, and blue
Wave above our heroes true
It makes us cry, it makes us weep
But in our hearts we will keep
The sacrifice our soldiers gave, they shall not die in vain
For they have given us the freedom they have fought to gain

This Memorial Day: WWII Vet Reminds Us In This Recording Of The Graphic Realities Of War | American Military News

This Memorial Day: WWII Vet Reminds Us In This Recording Of The Graphic Realities Of War | American Military News:
This Memorial Day: WWII Vet Reminds Us In This Recording Of The Graphic Realities Of War

This Memorial Day: WWII Vet Reminds Us In This Recording Of The Graphic Realities Of War Featured
A WWII veteran reminds us of the grim realities of war just in time for Memorial Day. This real audio recording features a veteran of the greatest generation recounting the time he made the “shot of a lifetime” while dropping bombs on German soldiers.
The WWII vets can be heard sharing a laugh about the situation. Despite his positive demeanor he takes the time to remind us that war is no laughing matter with this final quote:
“War is Hell…It’s either kill or be killed”
Listen to the full AudioBurst below.

Andrews Sisters Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy

Tribute to Veterans by Robert Burns

Lunch video-----Memorial Day Tribute

Noon Memory

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"A Massive 4th Amendment Breach": NR Editor Details Obama Admin's Intel-Gathering Abuses | Buck Sexton

"A Massive 4th Amendment Breach": NR Editor Details Obama Admin's Intel-Gathering Abuses | Buck Sexton:

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"“To do what they did, the administration had to violate a black-and-white rule that said you are not allowed to use the identifying information of American citizens in searching through the database that the NSA has for intelligence collection, that it has by tapping into big Internet systems,” McCarthy continued. “They got told, you can’t do this, and they did it, and they did it again and again and again.”"

The soldier.

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Memorial Day, and Decoration Day :: SteynOnline

Memorial Day, and Decoration Day :: SteynOnline:
"On the eve of Memorial Day, here's a piece we get a lot of requests for. 
It was first written for The Chicago Sun-Times and other papers in 2004, and is anthologized in my book The [Un]documented Mark Steyn
A lot of the controversies mentioned below - Abu Ghraib, etc - are forgotten, and others - Guantanamo Bay - became mysteriously less controversial after, oh, late January 2009. 
Time passes, and moss and lichen creep across ancient grave stones. 
But the men beneath them are forever young:
Memorial Day in my corner of New Hampshire is always the same. 
A clutch of veterans from the Second World War to the Gulf march round the common, followed by the town band, and the scouts, and the fifth-graders. 
The band plays "Anchors Aweigh," "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," "God Bless America" and, in an alarming nod to modernity, Ray Stevens' "Everything Is Beautiful (In Its Own Way)" (Billboard No. 1, May 1970). 
One of the town's selectmen gives a short speech, so do a couple of representatives from state organizations, and then the fifth-graders recite the Gettsyburg Address and the Great War's great poetry. 
There's a brief prayer and a three-gun salute, exciting the dogs and babies. 
Wreaths are laid. 
And then the crowd wends slowly up the hill to the Legion hut for ice cream, and a few veterans wonder, as they always do, if anybody understands what they did, and why they did it.
Before the First World War, it was called Decoration Day - a day for going to the cemetery and "strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion." 
Some decorated the resting places of fallen family members; others adopted for a day the graves of those who died too young to leave any descendants.
I wish we still did that. 
Lincoln's "mystic chords of memory" are difficult to hear in the din of the modern world, and one of the best ways to do it is to stand before an old headstone, read the name, and wonder at the young life compressed into those brute dates: 1840-1862. 1843-1864.
In my local cemetery, there's a monument over three graves, forebears of my hardworking assistant, although I didn't know that at the time I first came across them. 
Turner Grant, his cousin John Gilbert and his sister's fiancé Charles Lovejoy had been friends since boyhood and all three enlisted on the same day. 
Charles died on March 5, 1863, Turner on March 6, and John on March 11. 
Nothing splendid or heroic. 
They were tentmates in Virginia, and there was an outbreak of measles in the camp.
For some reason, there was a bureaucratic mixup, as there often is, and the army neglected to inform the families. 
Then, on their final journey home, the bodies were taken off the train at the wrong town. 
It was a Saturday afternoon and the stationmaster didn't want the caskets sitting there all weekend. 
So a man who knew where the Grants lived offered to take them up to the next town and drop them off on Sunday morning.
When he arrived, the family was at church, so he unloaded the coffins from his buggy and left without a word or a note to anyone. 
Imagine coming home from Sunday worship and finding three caskets waiting on the porch. Imagine being young Caroline Grant, and those caskets contain the bodies of your brother, your cousin and the man to whom you're betrothed.
That's a hell of a story behind the bald dates on three tombstones. 
If it happened today, maybe Caroline would be on Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric demanding proper compensation, and the truth about what happened, and why the politicians were covering it up. 
Maybe she'd form a group of victims' families. 
Maybe she'd call for a special commission to establish whether the government did everything it could to prevent disease outbreaks at army camps. 
Maybe, when they got around to forming the commission, she'd be booing and chanting during the officials' testimony, as several of the 9/11 families did during Mayor Rudy Giuliani's statement.
All wars are messy, and many of them seem small and unworthy even at the moment of triumph. 
Image result for Memorial Day, and Decoration DayThe sight of unkempt lice-infested Saddam Hussein yanked from his spider hole last December is not so very different from the published reports of Jefferson Davis' capture in May 1865, when he was said to be trying to skulk away in women's clothing, and spent the next several months being depicted by gleeful Northern cartoonists in hoop skirts, petticoats and crinolines (none of which he was actually wearing).
But, conquered and captured, an enemy shrivels, and you question what he ever had that necessitated such a sacrifice. 
The piercing clarity of war shades into the murky greys of post-war reconstruction. 
You think Iraq's a quagmire? 
Lincoln's "new birth of freedom" bogged down into a century-long quagmire of segregation, denial of civil rights, and the Ku Klux Klan. 
Does that mean the Civil War wasn't worth fighting? 
That, as Al Gore and other excitable types would say, Abe W. Lincoln lied to us?
Like the French Resistance, tiny in its day but of apparently unlimited manpower since the war ended, for some people it's not obvious which side to be on until the dust's settled. 
New York, for example, resisted the Civil War my small town's menfolk were so eager to enlist in. 
The big city was racked by bloody riots against the draft. 
And you can sort of see the rioters' point. 
More than 600,000 Americans died in the Civil War - or about 1.8 percent of the population. 
Today, if 1.8 percent of the population were killed in war, there would be 5.4 million graves to decorate on Decoration Day.
But that's the difference between then and now: the loss of proportion. 
They had victims galore back in 1863, but they weren't a victim culture. 
They had a lot of crummy decisions and bureaucratic screw-ups worth re-examining, but they weren't a nation that prioritized retroactive pseudo-legalistic self-flagellating vaudeville over all else. 
They had hellish setbacks but they didn't lose sight of the forest in order to obsess week after week on one tiny twig of one weedy little tree, as the Democrats do over Abu Ghraib.
There is something not just ridiculous but unbecoming about a hyperpower 300 million strong whose elites - from the deranged former vice president down - want the outcome of a war, and the fate of a nation, to hinge on one freaky jailhouse; elites who are willing to pay any price, bear any burden, as long as it's pain-free, squeaky-clean and over in a week. 
The sheer silliness dishonors the memory of all those we're supposed to be remembering this Memorial Day.
Playing by Gore-Kennedy rules, the Union would have lost the Civil War, the rebels the Revolutionary War, and the colonists the French and Indian Wars. 
There would, in other words, be no America. 
Even in its grief, my part of New Hampshire understood that 141 years ago. 
We should, too.

Memorial Day-----Saving Private Ryan Ending Scene

You ought to know!

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Polish PM on Manchester Attack: ‘Europe, Rise from Your Knees or You’ll Be Crying over Your Children Every Day’

Polish PM on Manchester Attack: ‘Europe, Rise from Your Knees or You’ll Be Crying over Your Children Every Day’:
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"The prime minister of Poland has launched a blistering attack on the “political elites” of Europe in the wake of the Manchester terror attack, warning the continent must put in place “strong politicians” willing to tackle the threat or risk “crying over your children”."

Memorial Day-----Saving Private Ryan opening cemetery scene

AM Memory

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History for May 29


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History for May 29 - On-This-Day.com
Patrick Henry 1736 - Prominent figure in the American Revolution, known for his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, Gilbert Keith Chesterton 1874 - Writer of philosophy, ontolory, poetry, Oswald Spengler (Oswald Arnold Gottfried Spengler) 1880 - German historian and philosopher
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Bob Hope 1903 - Comedian, actor, John Fitzgerald Kennedy (U.S.) 1917 - 35th President of the United States, refered to by his initials JFK, Al Unser, Sr. 1939 - Automobile racer
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1453 - Constantinople fell to Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, ending the Byzantine Empire.
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1765 - Patrick Henry denounced the Stamp Act before Virginia's House of Burgesses.
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1912 - Fifteen women were dismissed from their jobs at the Curtis Publishing Company in Philadelphia, PA, for dancing the Turkey Trot while on the job.
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1922 - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that organized baseball was a sport, not subject to antitrust laws.
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1953 - Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay became first men to reach the top of Mount Everest.
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1986 - Colonel Oliver North told National Security Advisor William McFarlane that profits from weapons sold to Iran were being diverted to the Contras.
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2001 - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that disabled golfer Casey Martin could use a cart to ride in tournaments.
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2015 - The Obama adminstration removed Cuba from the U.S. terrorism blacklist. The two countries had severed diplomatic relations in January of 1961.
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